Articles tagués cell migration

PDGF-A controls mesoderm cell orientation and radial intercalation during Xenopus gastrulation

PDGF-A controls mesoderm cell orientation and radial intercalation during Xenopus gastrulation

Erich W. Damm and Rudolf Winklbauer

Development 138, 565-575 (2011) doi:10.1242/dev.05690


Entre les deux y’a pas ‘dintermédiaire. Les gènes ne sont pas en mesure d’arrêter quoi que ce oit, ça tourne dans tous les sens d’une façon démentielle. [Source]


Lire la suite »

Publicités

, , , , , ,

Poster un commentaire

Directional migration of neural crest cells in vivo is regulated by Syndecan-4/Rac1 and non-canonical Wnt signaling/RhoA

Directional migration of neural crest cells in vivo is regulated by Syndecan-4/Rac1 and non-canonical Wnt signaling/RhoA

Helen K. Matthews, Lorena Marchant, Carlos Carmona-Fontaine, Sei Kuriyama, Juan Larraín, Mark R. Holt, Maddy Parsons and Roberto Mayor

Development 135, 1771-1780 (2008 ) doi: 10.1242/dev.017350

Lire la suite »

, , , , , , , ,

Poster un commentaire

The WAVE/SCAR complex promotes polarized cell movements and actin enrichment in epithelia during C. elegans embryogenesis

The WAVE/SCAR complex promotes polarized cell movements and actin enrichment in epithelia during C. elegans embryogenesis

Falshruti B. Patel, Yelena Y. Bernadskaya, Esteban Chen, Aesha Jobanputra, Zahra Pooladi, Kristy L. Freeman, Christelle Gally, William A. Mohler and Martha C. Soto

Developmental Biology Volume 324, Issue 2, 15 December 2008, Pages 297-309 doi:10.1016/j.ydbio.2008.09.023

Lire la suite »

, , , ,

Poster un commentaire

Wnt/β-Catenin and Fgf Signaling Control Collective Cell Migration by Restricting Chemokine Receptor Expression

Wnt/β-Catenin and Fgf Signaling Control Collective Cell Migration by Restricting Chemokine Receptor Expression

Andy Aman and Tatjana Piotrowski

Developmental Cell Volume 15, Issue 5, 11 November 2008, Pages 749-761 doi:10.1016/j.devcel.2008.10.002

Lire la suite »

, , , ,

Poster un commentaire

Compensation mechanism in tumor cell migration : mesenchymal–amoeboid transition after blocking of pericellular proteolysis

Compensation mechanism in tumor cell migration : mesenchymal–amoeboid transition after blocking of pericellular proteolysis

The Journal of Cell Biology, Volume 160, Number 2, 267-277

Katarina Wolf, Irina Mazo, Harry Leung, Katharina Engelke, Ulrich H. von Andrian, Elena I. Deryugina, Alex Y. Strongin, Eva-B. Bröcker and Peter Friedl


Dans la série « est-ce que le stress dû à la traction des filopodes s’accumule au niveau de la matrice extracellulaire », j’ai trouvé quelques vidéos informatives présentées en complément de ce papier de 2003, dont celle-ci :

Video 6 (6.8 MB)
Protease-independent crawling lacks structural matrix remodeling. Fiber bundling at leading and trailing edges is reduced. After detachment, intact fibers rebound to their original position. The cell tends to align in parallel to preformed fibers (contact guidance). The image size is 90 x 90 µm, and the time frame is 65 min

Intéressant.


Lire la suite »

, , , , , ,

Poster un commentaire

Non-canonical Wnt signaling through Wnt5a/b and a novel Wnt11 gene, Wnt11b, regulates cell migration during avian gastrulation

Non-canonical Wnt signaling through Wnt5a/b and a novel Wnt11 gene, Wnt11b, regulates cell migration during avian gastrulation. Dev Biol (2008) vol. 320 (2) doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2008.05.546

Katharine M. Hardy, Robert J. Garriock, Tatiana A. Yatskievych, Susan L. D’Agostino, Parker B. Antin and Paul A. Krieg

Lire la suite »

, , , , , , ,

Poster un commentaire

Endothelial cell guidance by VEGFA and FGF2 Endothelial cell migration in stable gradients of VEGFA and FGF2: Effects on chemotaxis and chemokinesis — Barkefors et al., 10.1074/jbc.M704917200 — Journal of Biological Chemistry

Endothelial cell migration in stable gradients of VEGFA and FGF2: Effects on chemotaxis and chemokinesis — doi: 10.1074/jbc.M704917200 — Journal of Biological Chemistry: « Papers In Press, published online ahead of print March 17, 2008
J. Biol. Chem, 10.1074/jbc.M704917200

Irmeli Barkefors, Sébastien Le Jan, Lars Jakobsson, Eduar Hejll, Gustav Carlson, Henrik Johansson, Jonas Jarvius, Jeong Won Park, Noo Li Jeon, and Johan Kreuger

Gradients of secreted signaling proteins guide growing blood vessels during both normal and pathological angiogenesis. However, the mechanisms by which endothelial cells integrate and respond to graded distributions of chemotactic factors are still poorly understood. We have in the present study investigated endothelial cell migration in response to hill-shaped gradients of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) using a novel microfluidic chemotaxis chamber (MCC). Cell migration was scored at the level of individual cells using time-lapse microscopy. A stable gradient of VEGFA165 ranging from 0-50 ng/ml over a distance of 400 µm was shown to strongly induce chemotaxis of endothelial cells of different vascular origin. VEGFA121, unable to bind proteoglycan and neuropilin coreceptors, was also shown to induce chemotaxis in this setup. Further, a gradient of FGF2 was able to attract venular but not arterial endothelial cells, albeit less efficiently than VEGFA165. Notably, constant levels of VEGFA165, but not of FGF2, were shown to efficiently reduce chemokinesis. Systematic exploration of different gradient shapes led to the identification of a minimal gradient steepness required for efficient cell guidance. Finally, analysis of cell migration in different regions of the applied gradients showed that chemotaxis is reduced when cells reach the high end of the gradient. Our findings suggest that chemotactic growth factor gradients may instruct endothelial cells to shift toward a non-migratory phenotype when approaching the growth factor source. »

, , , ,

Poster un commentaire