Articles tagués chemotaxis

A Cell-based Model of Endothelial Cell Migration, Proliferation and Maturation During Corneal Angiogenesis

A Cell-based Model of Endothelial Cell Migration, Proliferation and Maturation During Corneal Angiogenesis

Trachette Jackson and Xiaoming Zheng

Bulletin of Mathematical Biology doi: 10.1007/s11538-009-9471-1

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Imaging cell signalling and movement in development

Imaging cell signalling and movement in development

Manli Chuai, Dirk Dormann and Cornelis J. Weijer

Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology Article in Press, Uncorrected Proof doi:10.1016/j.semcdb.2009.09.001

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Collective cell migration in development

Collective cell migration in development

Cornelis J. Weijer

Journal of Cell Science 122, 3215-3223 (2009), doi: 10.1242/10.1242/jcs.036517

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Chemotaxis of Nonbiological Colloidal Rods

Chemotaxis of Nonbiological Colloidal Rods

Yiying Hong, Nicole M. K. Blackman, Nathaniel D. Kopp, Ayusman Sen, and Darrell Velegol

Phys. Rev. Lett. 2007, 99, 178103. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.178103


Tiens, ce papier m’avait échappé. Où va-t-on si le chimiotactisme se retrouve même chez des systèmes non-biologiques… 🙂


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Endothelial Cell Migration During Angiogenesis

Endothelial Cell Migration During Angiogenesis

Laurent Lamalice, Fabrice Le Boeuf, Jacques Huot

Circulation Research. 2007;100:782-794 doi: 10.1161/01.RES.0000259593.07661.1e

Endothelial cell migration is essential to angiogenesis. This motile process is directionally regulated by chemotactic, haptotactic, and mechanotactic stimuli and further involves degradation of the extracellular matrix to enable progression of the migrating cells. It requires the activation of several signaling pathways that converge on cytoskeletal remodeling. Then, it follows a series of events in which the endothelial cells extend, contract, and throw their rear toward the front and progress forward. The aim of this review is to give an integrative view of the signaling mechanisms that govern endothelial cell migration in the context of angiogenesis.

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Endothelial cell guidance by VEGFA and FGF2 Endothelial cell migration in stable gradients of VEGFA and FGF2: Effects on chemotaxis and chemokinesis — Barkefors et al., 10.1074/jbc.M704917200 — Journal of Biological Chemistry

Endothelial cell migration in stable gradients of VEGFA and FGF2: Effects on chemotaxis and chemokinesis — doi: 10.1074/jbc.M704917200 — Journal of Biological Chemistry: « Papers In Press, published online ahead of print March 17, 2008
J. Biol. Chem, 10.1074/jbc.M704917200

Irmeli Barkefors, Sébastien Le Jan, Lars Jakobsson, Eduar Hejll, Gustav Carlson, Henrik Johansson, Jonas Jarvius, Jeong Won Park, Noo Li Jeon, and Johan Kreuger

Gradients of secreted signaling proteins guide growing blood vessels during both normal and pathological angiogenesis. However, the mechanisms by which endothelial cells integrate and respond to graded distributions of chemotactic factors are still poorly understood. We have in the present study investigated endothelial cell migration in response to hill-shaped gradients of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) using a novel microfluidic chemotaxis chamber (MCC). Cell migration was scored at the level of individual cells using time-lapse microscopy. A stable gradient of VEGFA165 ranging from 0-50 ng/ml over a distance of 400 µm was shown to strongly induce chemotaxis of endothelial cells of different vascular origin. VEGFA121, unable to bind proteoglycan and neuropilin coreceptors, was also shown to induce chemotaxis in this setup. Further, a gradient of FGF2 was able to attract venular but not arterial endothelial cells, albeit less efficiently than VEGFA165. Notably, constant levels of VEGFA165, but not of FGF2, were shown to efficiently reduce chemokinesis. Systematic exploration of different gradient shapes led to the identification of a minimal gradient steepness required for efficient cell guidance. Finally, analysis of cell migration in different regions of the applied gradients showed that chemotaxis is reduced when cells reach the high end of the gradient. Our findings suggest that chemotactic growth factor gradients may instruct endothelial cells to shift toward a non-migratory phenotype when approaching the growth factor source. »

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